Posted 14 hours ago

Heart Necklace

A beautifully intricate sterling silver heart shown anatomically correct is strung on a dainty sterling silver chain. A perfect every day necklace to be worn alone or layered.

Your usual heart, but not your usual heart pendant.

(Source: moshita)

Posted 1 day ago

nianymue:

wickedclothes:

Kraken / Squid Bronze Ear Cuff

Giant squids were often feared by sailors and pirates alike, particularly the mighty kraken. Crafted out of fine bronze, this ear cuff resembles the commonly feared kraken, and requires no piercings to be worn. Sold on Etsy.

OMG WE DO NOT SOW.

Hmm… no piercings required. I should get a pair and then go eat at a seafood buffet.

Posted 2 days ago

The Last Japanese Mermaids

I came across ama divers on Mikimoto Pearl Island in Toba, within the Shima Peninsula in Mie prefecture. Unfortunately, my timing was not good and I missed the diving demonstration. The article linked to features a series of old photographs of ama divers, taken at a time — before the introduction of wet suits — when they dived topless.

At the end of the article there is a short clip featuring a vignette from the classic Japanese film Tampopo. It is one of my favourite movies ever, though I admit that I did not make the connection of that vignette with ama divers until now.

Posted 3 days ago
signum-crucis:

Married on a CrucifixFr Michael Mullan, LC
Imagine a world without divorce. Imagine families without separation. Imagine no children or hearts torn apart.
People of one place in this world do not have to imagine.
In the town of Siroki-Brijeg in Herzegovina not one of the 13,000 inhabitants can recall a single divorce or broken family.
What is their secret? One look at their marriage rite says it all.
When the bride and bridegroom go to the church to be married they carry a crucifix with them. The priest blesses the crucifix and exclaims, “You have found your cross! It is a cross to love, to carry with you, a cross that is not thrown off but rather treasured.”
When they interchange the marital vows, the bride puts her right hand on this crucifix and the groom puts his right hand over hers. Both are united to the cross. The priest covers their hands with his stole while they pronounce their promises to love each other in good times and in bad.
Then they both first kiss the cross, not each other. If one abandons the other, they abandon Christ on the cross.
Afterwards, the newly-weds cross the threshold of their home to enthrone that same crucifix in a place of honour. It becomes the reference point of their lives and the place of family prayer.
In times of difficulty and misunderstandings, as all human relationships experience, they do not turn immediately to the lawyer or psychologist, they turn to the cross. They kneel, cry and open up their hearts begging for the strength to pardon and implore the Lord’s help.
The children are taught to reverently kiss the crucifix daily and to thank God for the day before going to bed. These children dream of enthroning one day a crucifix of their own.
The family is indissolubly united to the cross of Christ. Is this simply a morbid outlook on marital and family life? Or is it a piece of wisdom that few in our modern world can understand. Until our world does, it will continue to imagine and long for the unbroken hearth.
-=:†:=-
"The Sacrament of marriage comes as do all the sacraments from the wounded side of Christ as He lay ‘asleep’ in death, when Christ was pierced by a sword and blood and water and the Holy Spirit flowed out. At that moment the Church and all the sacraments came from the side of Christ as Eve was taken from the side of Adam. The Church is the Bride of Christ and the Catholic marriage is to be a living example of Christ and His Bride the Church. If the Catholic couple lives in a state of grace and has the sacrament of marriage they receive constant grace from God to love one another with the very LOVE of God. It is the vocation of the spouses to sanctify one another and be open to new life. According to Archbishop Sheen it takes 3 to get married: husband, wife and Christ. Marriage works in Christ.”—my friend Kathleen Ann

signum-crucis:

Married on a Crucifix
Fr Michael Mullan, LC

Imagine a world without divorce. Imagine families without separation. Imagine no children or hearts torn apart.

People of one place in this world do not have to imagine.

In the town of Siroki-Brijeg in Herzegovina not one of the 13,000 inhabitants can recall a single divorce or broken family.

What is their secret? One look at their marriage rite says it all.

When the bride and bridegroom go to the church to be married they carry a crucifix with them. The priest blesses the crucifix and exclaims, “You have found your cross! It is a cross to love, to carry with you, a cross that is not thrown off but rather treasured.

When they interchange the marital vows, the bride puts her right hand on this crucifix and the groom puts his right hand over hers. Both are united to the cross. The priest covers their hands with his stole while they pronounce their promises to love each other in good times and in bad.

Then they both first kiss the cross, not each other. If one abandons the other, they abandon Christ on the cross.

Afterwards, the newly-weds cross the threshold of their home to enthrone that same crucifix in a place of honour. It becomes the reference point of their lives and the place of family prayer.

In times of difficulty and misunderstandings, as all human relationships experience, they do not turn immediately to the lawyer or psychologist, they turn to the cross. They kneel, cry and open up their hearts begging for the strength to pardon and implore the Lord’s help.

The children are taught to reverently kiss the crucifix daily and to thank God for the day before going to bed. These children dream of enthroning one day a crucifix of their own.

The family is indissolubly united to the cross of Christ. Is this simply a morbid outlook on marital and family life? Or is it a piece of wisdom that few in our modern world can understand. Until our world does, it will continue to imagine and long for the unbroken hearth.

-=:†:=-

"The Sacrament of marriage comes as do all the sacraments from the wounded side of Christ as He lay ‘asleep’ in death, when Christ was pierced by a sword and blood and water and the Holy Spirit flowed out. At that moment the Church and all the sacraments came from the side of Christ as Eve was taken from the side of Adam. The Church is the Bride of Christ and the Catholic marriage is to be a living example of Christ and His Bride the Church. If the Catholic couple lives in a state of grace and has the sacrament of marriage they receive constant grace from God to love one another with the very LOVE of God. It is the vocation of the spouses to sanctify one another and be open to new life. According to Archbishop Sheen it takes 3 to get married: husband, wife and Christ. Marriage works in Christ.”
my friend Kathleen Ann

Posted 4 days ago

stories-yet-to-be-written:

The Best Pictures Of This Year’s Japanese Cherry Blossoms

The Japanese cherry blossom, known as the Sakura in Japanese, is the flower of a cherry tree that is cultivated for its decorative features rather than for cherries (it doesn’t bear fruit). The overwhelming beauty of the cherry blossom bloom has been known and adored for ages. The blooming period is associated with Japanese traditions, culture, aesthetics, and is a bittersweet metaphor for the ephemeral nature of life itself.

The blooming cherry blossoms herald the beginning of the centuries-old Hanami festival – the traditional Japanese custom of picnicking under trees rich with flowering Sakura branches and enjoying this short but striking first breath of spring. The blossoming wave usually starts in Okinawa in January or February and progresses through all of Japan until April or May. The cherry blossom front (Sakura zensen) can be conveniently tracked every year using this calendar.

Source: Demilked Magazine

Not exactly the usual symbolism, but… happy and blessed Easter!!

Posted 5 days ago

How I found my home and heart in our Bukit Brown: Claire Leow at TEDxSingapore

Posted 6 days ago

Django 1.7 Release Tee

Posted 1 week ago

travelry:

The most beautiful cat cafe I have been to. It’s called Temari no Ouchi (Temari’s house) in Tokyo, Japan. The soft music and ambience feels like you are in a Studio Ghibli film. Had to take the Japan Railway there, but was totally worth the extra trip, & unlike the central Tokyo cat cafes, this one has no time limit, so feels totally relaxed. Several girls were even sleeping there amongst the cats.

Cats are evil, but they can also be cute.